Florida Democratic Party Searching for a Bilingual Media Director

flademsBy Evelyn Perez-Verdia

Viva the FDP!  The day has come.  After a strong initiative from various leaders in Florida, The Florida Democratic Party has agreed on the importance of hiring  a communcations professional to serve as Press Secretary and Director of Hispanic Media for the 2016 campaign cycle.  Speaking further to Chairwoman Allison Tant about this position,  Political Pasion asked her if the position would continue past 2016.  Chairwoman Tant stated: “It will be ongoing after ’16 as long as we have the budget to fund it.  I am committed to see this happen.  So now put the word out so we have good applicants!”  In addition, the party has hired Sheyla Asencios as their Hispanic Outreach Coordinator and she will start working with the FDP starting September.  Samantha Pedrosa, has also joined the FDP team and started in their finance department yesterday.  Allison Tant ended by saying: “We are building a great team!”  Here are the details for those who wish to apply to the position:

The Florida Democratic Party is seeking communications professional to serve as Press Secretary and Director of Hispanic Media for the 2016 campaign cycle. 

This position will assist the communications director in the day-to-day responsibilities of the communications department and will oversee Spanish-language communication for the Party. This will include on-the-record conversations with local, state, and national media, and the drafting and translating of press releases, op-eds, and social media content.

The job will be based in South Florida with frequent travel to Tallahassee and statewide.

Responsibilities: 

  • Assist the communications director in day-to-day press responsibilities and rapid response
  • Develop relationship with Hispanic press outlets and reporters
  • Manage Spanish-speaking surrogates throughout Florida
  • Organize, pitch, and execute earned media events targeted at Hispanic media outlets
  • Write or translate press releases, op-eds, and social media posts
Qualifications: 
  • Fluency in Spanish (speaking, reading, and writing)
  • Experience with media, public relations, or journalism
  • Demonstrated exceptional

Please email resumes to Max Steele at msteele@fladems.com

Hispanics in Florida Request Bilingual Spokesperson from Florida Political Parties

spokespersonBy Evelyn Perez-Verdia

Update March 11, 2015

In a group initiative, over 50 Hispanics from different counties in Florida, wrote a letter to the Florida Democratic Party and the Republican Party of Florida asking them to hire bilingual communications directors to produce and transcreate bilingual press releases, act as spokespeople and share news on social media for an ever growing Latino community that thirsts for information about the political climate in our state. The individuals are members of media in Spanish, Hispanic community leaders and concerned Hispanics.

Here is the letter:

United Hispanics/Latinos of Florida

President: Allison Tant, The Florida Democratic Party

President: Blaise Ingoglia, The Republican Party of Florida 

Dear Republican and Democratic parties of Florida,

As members of Florida’s Spanish-language media who cover politics, and individuals who care about the Hispanic community, we are troubled by the lack of Spanish or bilingual communication aimed at the Latino community by either party.

There is a dire need in your party for a bilingual communications director who has the ability to accurately relay your message to the Latino media.

In the last 2012 presidential election, Florida had the highest Hispanic voter turnout of the nation – 62 percent – compared to a national average of 49 percent. We surpassed states like Texas and California, yet the parties in those states recognize that reaching Latino voters and informing the media with culturally relevant messaging is important. For example, the Texas Democratic Party has a bilingual website and communication director.

Florida will be a key state in the 2016 presidential elections. According to the census, approximately 3.6 million Florida residents speak Spanish. We also have an increasing number of Hispanics registered to vote who list no party affiliation. Many do not understand the inner workings of the parties and the important work they do even before the official election season begins. In non-campaign years, our community still thirsts for information about the political climate in our state.

As community leaders and members of Spanish-language media, we take our role to inform the public seriously and urge both parties to rectify this situation. Adding Spanish-fluent communication directors to produce and transcreate bilingual press releases, act as spokespeople and share news on social media would be an asset to both parties.

Our intent here is to convince you that Hispanic engagement is crucial, no matter the political persuasion. Latino voters are the future of the American electorate. Do not pass up the opportunity to engage with our community in meaningful ways.

We appreciate your time and consideration in this matter.

List updated March 11, 2015

Sincerely,

(In alphabetical order)

Danny Alvarez, Attorney and Hispanic Community Leader- Hillsborough County

Carlos Barbosa, Vice President, G4S – Palm Beach County

Luis Eduardo Baron, Publisher, www.tvnet.us –Sarasota County, Florida

Annie Betancourt, Former State Representative-D116—Miami-Dade County

Luigi Boria, Mayor, the City of Doral

Norma Camero Reno, Hispanic community activist—Hillsborough County

Adriana Carrera, Publisher, www.lafamiliadebroward.com —Broward County

Liliana Castaño, Web Content Editor, Mayin Media INC—Broward County

Alan Clendenin, Vice Chairman, The Florida Democratic Party—Hillsborough County

Armando Chirinos, Publisher, http://www.venezuelaaldia.com

Benjamin F. DeYurre, Publisher, www.EconomyRecovery.Blogspot.Com –Miami-Dade County

Lourdes Diaz, President, Divercity Communications-Broward County

Maria Eugenia Fanti, Freelance Journalist and TV Producer-Miami-Dade County

Anna M. Figueroa, President, Vantaga Communications—Miami-Dade County

Cesar Gomez, Manatee County Young Republicans & Hispanic Leader–Sarasota and Manatee Counties

Ana Gonzalez- Student at Florida State University—Leon County

Jolie Gonzalez-Padilla, CEO/Publisher, Latin Times Media and Magazine – Florida

Luisana Gonzalez, Floridian Voter—Broward County

Dolores Guzman—Hispanic Community Leader—Volusia County

Maria Eldeny Hale-Sprinkle, DMI US Mission Director, Pasco County

Laura Hinojosa—Floridian Voter—Palm Beach County

Abel Ibarra, Writer, Miami-Dade County

Christian Leon, Hispanic Community Advocate-Hillsborough County

Tatiana Londoño, Supply Chain Director, Biomet 3i-Palm Beach Countyy

Rafael Lopez, Chair of the Hispanic Vote PAC- Broward County, Florida

Jesus E. Medina, Political Scientist and National Hispanic Community Leader, Miami-Dade County

Marianela Mendez, Editor, www.miamidiario.com –Miami-Dade County, Florida

Tony Morejon, Hispanic Community Leader. –Hillsborough County, Florida

Maggie Emmanuelle Nieto, Community Organizer, Miami-Dade Community Action and Human Services Dept.—Miami-Dade County

Orlando R Nieves, VP-IMS, Univision–Tampa Bay

Alfredo Ortega, Hispanic Community Advocate—Broward County

Pilar Ortiz, Hispanic Community Leader – Columnist (7 Dias Newspaper) – Hillsborough County

Maria Padilla, Publisher, www.orlandolatino.org- Orange County

Militse Padilla, Copy Desk Manager, http://www.venezuelaaldia.com

Victor Padilla, Vice-President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Tampa Bay

Rafael Palacio, Editor, El Sentinel Orlando—Orange County

Luisa Pantin, U.S. Citizen and voter—Broward County

Carlos Pereira, President, Venezuelan American Democratic Club—Miami-Dade County

Evelyn Perez-Verdia, Founder, www.politicalpasion.com. –Broward County, Florida

Gonzalo Perez-Verdia, Vice President, Wealth Management—Broward County

Elizabeth Pines, Board Director, League of Women Voters of Florida—Miami-Dade County

Lorena Rivas Hardwick, Former Regional Political Director, Charlie Crist for Governor and current Legislative Aide Tampa City Council, Hillsborough County

Jason Rubinstein, Vice President – Portfolio Manager, Hillsborough County

Yvonne Salas, Publisher, Portada Florida Magazine- Florida

Gil Sanchez, Attorney and Hispanic Community Leader- Hillsborough

Maria Eunice Sanchez, U.S. Citizen since 2010 and Floridian voter-Broward County

Daniel Suarez, Hispanic Community Advocate- Hillsborough County.

Rey Valdes,  Hispanic Community Leader—Miami-Dade

Javier Torres, Venezuelan Attorney and Hispanic Community Leader- Hillsborough County.

Jonathan Torres, Tampa Bay Field Director, Hispanic Initiatives, Republican Party of Florida

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ)-South Florida Chapter

Here is the following response from Chairman Blaise Ingoglia and Chairwoman Allison Tant in reference to our request:

Chair Letter to Perez-Verdia March 6, 2015

letter_3_10_15

Campaigns and Political Parties Need to Spice it Up

Domino Effect English

 By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

 – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Hispanics or Latinos. Most of us are known to be warm individuals, amicable and culturally engaging. We do not tend to be a society that is reluctant to open up to those who approach us. Quite the opposite. We are that weird family inviting you over to our house without hardly even knowing you and trying to make you drink one more tequila as we try to “enchilarte” (make you eat something spicy that you can’t handle) for our entertainment. At least that is how it is in our Mexican-Colombian household. Like we would say in Spanish: “Entre mas amigos, mejor.” Translated to English; “the more friends we have, the better it is for us”.

With our culture in mind, it is mind boggling how such a great political force is not being engaged by those in political power. There is no turning back my friends. You cannot wait six months before the 2016 or 2018 election to come knocking on our door. You cannot turn away the opportunity of having a debate in a national TV channel in Spanish. You need to get to know us, and allow us to know you.  You need to gain our trust and tell us why we are so important to you, to our state and to this country.

Not engaging the Hispanic/Latino community

According to Latino Decisions, a leader in Latino political opinion research, in 2014, 55% of Latinos that were polled said they were not contacted by a campaign, political party or community organization in the final months before the election. The polls they have reported over the years document the consistently low rates of campaign engagement of Latinos/Hispanics eligible to vote.

In Florida, a state where the largest minority of registered voters is Hispanic, the 2014 gubernatorial candidate won by about 1 percentage point-a 61,000 vote difference. In 2012, Latino Decisions reported that 48 percent of registered Latinos voted nationwide. According to numbers shared by Miami Herald’s political reporter Marc Caputo, 64 percent (over 1 million) of registered Latinos voted in the 2012 Florida General Election.  As stated by different analysts and even supervisors of elections, people go out to vote based on the inertia that the campaigns and the political parties place into the election. After having conversations with both Latino Democrats and Republicans around the state of Florida, here are some observations:

We do not know who to vote for

The domino effect in reference to Hispanics and politicos is that Hispanics do not get involved due to not knowing who to vote for. Also, according to those individuals who are engaging our community, many Latinos do not know what each political party represents. To their dismay, political parties and campaigns do not take the time to invest in them.

Wait for the “big honchos” to infiltrate the state

2016 is on its way and what seems to be the tendency for political parties and campaigns to do here in Florida is to wait for the national party team to bring in their “movers and shakers” in order for them to win Florida. Many do not know the community in Florida, they just see numbers. Every 4 years a new group of people come in and have to start practically from scratch trying to figure out how to reach our community. Those Hispanics/Latinos who know the community and who are from Florida are not included and their knowledge is underestimated.

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