#enespañol

EnespanolPor Evelyn Perez-Verdia

  • De acuerdo con el Centro de Investigación Pew 35.8 millones de Hispanos hablan español en su casa.
  • De acuerdo con la Oficina del Censo de los Estados Unidos aproximadamente 3.6 millones de residentes en la Florida hablan español.
  • Muchos  candidatos y partidos políticos de diferentes estados en los Estados Unidos no incorporan el español en sus páginas web.
  •  Muchos no tienen directores de comunicación que son fluidos en el español.
  • Por medio de La Ley del Derecho del Voto, el Departamento de Justicia requiere que las oficinas de elecciones tengan información en español si más del 5 por ciento de los ciudadanos que tienen edad para votar son considerados parte de ese grupo de lenguaje minoritario y tiene un inglés limitado.
  • En Florida, los condados de Broward, Hardee, Hendry, Hillsborough, Lee, Miami-Dade, Orange, Osceola, Palm Beach y Polk se les requiere por ley proveer asistencia en español.
  • El partido Democrata y Republicano de la Florida no tienen su pagina web tambien traducida al español.
  • El Partido Republicano de la Florida acaba de contratar a un director de comunicaciones bilingüe, pero el Partido Republicano de Texas y California todavía no tienen a un director de comunicaciones bilingüe. El Partido Demócrata de California y Texas tienen directores de comunicaciones bilingües, pero el Partido Demócrata de la Florida todavía no.

It is pretty tough when you are not proficient in a language, right?  To read in English, go here: https://politicalpasionespanol.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/enespanol-campaign/

#enespañol

Thought Provoker: Jim Cason, Mayor of Coral Gables, Florida

It is a pleasure to have Mayor Jim Cason as a “Thought Provoker” on Political Pasión.  These “Thought Provokers” are individuals (or a group) that make a difference in our community and challenge us to do the same.

Script translated into English:

Evelyn Perez-Verdia: “This is Evelyn Perez-Verdia with Political Pasion and here we are with Mayor Jim Cason of Coral Gables.  First of all,  congratulations on your most recent win as mayor of Coral Gables.”

Mayor Cason:  “Thank  you.  Three elections in four years.”

Evelyn Perez-Verdia: “Wow, incredible.  We are here Mayor Cason to talk about something that is important to us.  Could you share with us why it is important for Hispanics to go out and vote?”

Mayor Cason: “I would say that in many places in Latin America–I have lived in 15 countries and the opportunity to vote is not presented for various reasons.  In Cuba you can not vote because their is no voting.  Other countries can not vote due to poverty or  due to their system in which the people can not vote freely or their vote is stolen.  That is why it is important for people who have the opportunity to vote, to do so.   Political power comes from voting and politicians are going to hear those who vote.  So, if people do not vote, they are not going to influence the decisions of the government.”

Evelyn Perez-Verdia:  “What do you think the Hispanic lacks so that he or she goes out to vote?”

Mayor Cason: “Here in the United States?”

Evelyn Perez-Verdia: “Yes.”

Mayor Cason: “I believe that here the elderly vote more than the youth.  In the case of Coral Gables, a great part of the residents are Cuban-Americans who left their country in ’61 and they recognize the importance of the vote, they have passion and want to express their points of view.  The youth, not only Hispanics but all of those of the same nature do not vote.  They come out in presidential elections and come out in November.  Yet in local elections for an example, very few vote.   They do not see how it influences their life and what happens in a city, yet they are incorrect.  Everyone should vote, especially the youth. Sometimes things go well and they don’t feel it is necessary to vote.  It is always necessary to vote. Here in Coral Gables, twenty-five percent vote in the elections, on a good day. Twenty-five percent of the voters that are registered.”

Evelyn Perez-Verdia:  “Wow.  Well to finalize, could you give a message to the youth about the importance of going out to vote and why it is important.”

Mayor Cason:  “If the youth have a vision of how their country and their community should be, it is not going to happen by them waiting on a miracle.  It will need to happen through a political process.  If they do not vote we are not going to know what they want, we are just going to assume–and what they want is not going to happen.”

Evelyn Perez-Verdia: “Exactly. Thank you very much, Mayor.”

Mayor Cason: “You are welcome.”

Hispanics in Florida Request Bilingual Spokesperson from Florida Political Parties

spokespersonBy Evelyn Perez-Verdia

Update March 11, 2015

In a group initiative, over 50 Hispanics from different counties in Florida, wrote a letter to the Florida Democratic Party and the Republican Party of Florida asking them to hire bilingual communications directors to produce and transcreate bilingual press releases, act as spokespeople and share news on social media for an ever growing Latino community that thirsts for information about the political climate in our state. The individuals are members of media in Spanish, Hispanic community leaders and concerned Hispanics.

Here is the letter:

United Hispanics/Latinos of Florida

President: Allison Tant, The Florida Democratic Party

President: Blaise Ingoglia, The Republican Party of Florida 

Dear Republican and Democratic parties of Florida,

As members of Florida’s Spanish-language media who cover politics, and individuals who care about the Hispanic community, we are troubled by the lack of Spanish or bilingual communication aimed at the Latino community by either party.

There is a dire need in your party for a bilingual communications director who has the ability to accurately relay your message to the Latino media.

In the last 2012 presidential election, Florida had the highest Hispanic voter turnout of the nation – 62 percent – compared to a national average of 49 percent. We surpassed states like Texas and California, yet the parties in those states recognize that reaching Latino voters and informing the media with culturally relevant messaging is important. For example, the Texas Democratic Party has a bilingual website and communication director.

Florida will be a key state in the 2016 presidential elections. According to the census, approximately 3.6 million Florida residents speak Spanish. We also have an increasing number of Hispanics registered to vote who list no party affiliation. Many do not understand the inner workings of the parties and the important work they do even before the official election season begins. In non-campaign years, our community still thirsts for information about the political climate in our state.

As community leaders and members of Spanish-language media, we take our role to inform the public seriously and urge both parties to rectify this situation. Adding Spanish-fluent communication directors to produce and transcreate bilingual press releases, act as spokespeople and share news on social media would be an asset to both parties.

Our intent here is to convince you that Hispanic engagement is crucial, no matter the political persuasion. Latino voters are the future of the American electorate. Do not pass up the opportunity to engage with our community in meaningful ways.

We appreciate your time and consideration in this matter.

List updated March 11, 2015

Sincerely,

(In alphabetical order)

Danny Alvarez, Attorney and Hispanic Community Leader- Hillsborough County

Carlos Barbosa, Vice President, G4S – Palm Beach County

Luis Eduardo Baron, Publisher, www.tvnet.us –Sarasota County, Florida

Annie Betancourt, Former State Representative-D116—Miami-Dade County

Luigi Boria, Mayor, the City of Doral

Norma Camero Reno, Hispanic community activist—Hillsborough County

Adriana Carrera, Publisher, www.lafamiliadebroward.com —Broward County

Liliana Castaño, Web Content Editor, Mayin Media INC—Broward County

Alan Clendenin, Vice Chairman, The Florida Democratic Party—Hillsborough County

Armando Chirinos, Publisher, http://www.venezuelaaldia.com

Benjamin F. DeYurre, Publisher, www.EconomyRecovery.Blogspot.Com –Miami-Dade County

Lourdes Diaz, President, Divercity Communications-Broward County

Maria Eugenia Fanti, Freelance Journalist and TV Producer-Miami-Dade County

Anna M. Figueroa, President, Vantaga Communications—Miami-Dade County

Cesar Gomez, Manatee County Young Republicans & Hispanic Leader–Sarasota and Manatee Counties

Ana Gonzalez- Student at Florida State University—Leon County

Jolie Gonzalez-Padilla, CEO/Publisher, Latin Times Media and Magazine – Florida

Luisana Gonzalez, Floridian Voter—Broward County

Dolores Guzman—Hispanic Community Leader—Volusia County

Maria Eldeny Hale-Sprinkle, DMI US Mission Director, Pasco County

Laura Hinojosa—Floridian Voter—Palm Beach County

Abel Ibarra, Writer, Miami-Dade County

Christian Leon, Hispanic Community Advocate-Hillsborough County

Tatiana Londoño, Supply Chain Director, Biomet 3i-Palm Beach Countyy

Rafael Lopez, Chair of the Hispanic Vote PAC- Broward County, Florida

Jesus E. Medina, Political Scientist and National Hispanic Community Leader, Miami-Dade County

Marianela Mendez, Editor, www.miamidiario.com –Miami-Dade County, Florida

Tony Morejon, Hispanic Community Leader. –Hillsborough County, Florida

Maggie Emmanuelle Nieto, Community Organizer, Miami-Dade Community Action and Human Services Dept.—Miami-Dade County

Orlando R Nieves, VP-IMS, Univision–Tampa Bay

Alfredo Ortega, Hispanic Community Advocate—Broward County

Pilar Ortiz, Hispanic Community Leader – Columnist (7 Dias Newspaper) – Hillsborough County

Maria Padilla, Publisher, www.orlandolatino.org- Orange County

Militse Padilla, Copy Desk Manager, http://www.venezuelaaldia.com

Victor Padilla, Vice-President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Tampa Bay

Rafael Palacio, Editor, El Sentinel Orlando—Orange County

Luisa Pantin, U.S. Citizen and voter—Broward County

Carlos Pereira, President, Venezuelan American Democratic Club—Miami-Dade County

Evelyn Perez-Verdia, Founder, www.politicalpasion.com. –Broward County, Florida

Gonzalo Perez-Verdia, Vice President, Wealth Management—Broward County

Elizabeth Pines, Board Director, League of Women Voters of Florida—Miami-Dade County

Lorena Rivas Hardwick, Former Regional Political Director, Charlie Crist for Governor and current Legislative Aide Tampa City Council, Hillsborough County

Jason Rubinstein, Vice President – Portfolio Manager, Hillsborough County

Yvonne Salas, Publisher, Portada Florida Magazine- Florida

Gil Sanchez, Attorney and Hispanic Community Leader- Hillsborough

Maria Eunice Sanchez, U.S. Citizen since 2010 and Floridian voter-Broward County

Daniel Suarez, Hispanic Community Advocate- Hillsborough County.

Rey Valdes,  Hispanic Community Leader—Miami-Dade

Javier Torres, Venezuelan Attorney and Hispanic Community Leader- Hillsborough County.

Jonathan Torres, Tampa Bay Field Director, Hispanic Initiatives, Republican Party of Florida

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ)-South Florida Chapter

Here is the following response from Chairman Blaise Ingoglia and Chairwoman Allison Tant in reference to our request:

Chair Letter to Perez-Verdia March 6, 2015

letter_3_10_15

The Hispanic Vote: The Largest Minority Voting Bloc in Florida

Hispanic family outside home

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

The most recent voter registration numbers as of July 28, 2014 show that there are 1,705,985 Hispanics registered to vote in Florida in the upcoming elections. 14% of the 11, 807,507 Florida registered voters are Hispanic, making us the largest minority voting bloc in Florida.  We surpassed the African American vote in Florida by 100,000.  However, our numbers are possibly higher due to the fact that the voter registration applications did not start including the term Hispanic until after 1995 on the voting registration application.  In addition, to this day, it is optional to place if you are Hispanic or not.

The five largest counties with registered Hispanics are:

 710,446 in Miami Dade County

190,322 in Broward County

153,387 in Orange County

113,380 in Hillsborough County

81,641 in Palm Beach County

This makes South Florida the most populous area of Hispanic voters in Florida.  In addition, we see why the Hispanic vote is the swing vote for the upcoming 2014 elections.

466,778 Hispanics are Republicans, 652,784 are Democrats and 558,707 have No Party Affiliation. There are only 20,831 registered as Independents.  Due to the differences in cultural, political and social beliefs, it is very difficult to know how Hispanics are going to sway.  The Hispanic vote is one of the few votes that campaigns will need to fight for.

You may ask; why such a large amount of No Party Affiliation?  My theory?  When I was spokeswoman at the Supervisor of Elections office in Broward County, the Voter Education and Outreach team would go to the Naturalization ceremonies to register new citizens.  Many new citizens did not know what it meant to be a Republican or Democrat, so they opted to place No Party Affiliation when they registered.  We live in a society where many Hispanics do not understand the beliefs of the two strongest parties that exist in the United States.  Another theory is that those Hispanics, who do understand the political parties, are tired of promises, pandering and punishment and have changed their affiliation from a specific party to focusing on what a person has to give as a candidate.  Hispanics, even when they are associated with a certain party, vote for the person and not the party.  Although many may not understand what their political views are, they do get brownie points for being charismatic, Hispanic and for being verbal in regards to the issues that matter to Hispanics.  Others just want a candidate that stands up for his or her beliefs.

Continue reading

Tips On Winning The Hispanic Vote

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

Tip: if running a statewide campaign, 15% of your media budget should be focused on Hispanic media outlets. We are 15% or more of the vote. Remember to not only invest in TV, but also print and radio. Do not forget about our local community papers in Spanish–they are the gatekeepers to the Hispanic community. I also mention some other things to keep in mind for the upcoming election season.

Are You For Or Against Legalizing Medical Marihuana?

 By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

The finger puppet’s name is Señor Dedo Politico (Mr. Political Finger).  I created him to give a different view to politics.   I have many friends that hear me speak about politics and find it absolutely boring.  They tell me that they don’t like politics, they are immune to it, and sadly enough, they are the ones who also don’t vote when they are U.S. citizens and could.  I want to captivate them and make politics fun.  I want to remind those that dislike politics that voting allows you to have a voice.  The choice to legalize or not medical marihuana will be on the Florida voting ballot this upcoming General Election. This is my way of saying to those that do not vote that politics matters and we can have a say in it.

Sr. Dedo Politico Marihuana