The Political Power of Mr. 305

PitbullBy Evelyn Perez-Verdia

I sometimes drive through Little Havana, which in my view is one of the most enchanting neighborhoods in Miami to go through during the night.  You look inside one barber shop, and all the men are getting their hair cut as they are covered with smocks with the Cuban flag.  Men are playing dominos in a park surrounded by murals.

There was once a little boy who lived in this neighborhood and who possibly every day took a glimpse east toward a powerful downtown Miami while he had nothing in his pockets.  Born in 1981, the little boy grew up in the midst of drugs, neglect, and corruption in the ghetto known as “la Pequeña Habana”.  At 3 he could recite the poems of Jose Marti, Cuba’s national hero.  He grew up in rough circumstances, in a time where so many had so much dislike for the influx of Hispanics that had arrived to Florida.  What is so amazing is that those same conditions were what gave him the power to overcome fear and try to take all of his pain out through the spoken-word known as rapping.

That little boy was named Armando Christian Perez, the son of Cuban expatriates, born from a Peter Pan Mother and a Mariel Boat Father.  Destiny picked Armando, a powerful man now known to the world as Pitbull to overcome it all and become the skin and bones of the “American Dream”.

Pitbull and Politics

Pitbull started getting a name for himself, stopped dealing drugs and started building a relationship with his father that ended short due to a cancer diagnosis.  His father passed away in 2006.  According to an article from MTV: “From then, his father’s memory and his Cuban pride fueled Pit’s career. That year, Pitbull and a host of artists recorded a Spanish version of the U.S. national anthem which even caught the radar of President George W. Bush and allowed Pit to speak out on behalf of Latino immigrants.”

In 2012 Pitbull appeared at an Obama Rally where he gave a speech sharing the fact that it does not matter what color of skin we have, we must be united and moved forward.  See video here: Pitbulls speech at Obama event, source EFE:

In 2014, Pitbull tweeted a picture of him to his 19.3 million followers at a fundraiser for Florida Governor Rick Scott a week before Scott’s re-election campaign for Governor.  Pitbull wrote: “Proud to meet and discuss Florida’s future with Governor @scottforflorida LG @lopezcantera and Rep @ErikFresenFL

Focusing on the Unknown

Now, due to not showing his affiliation to one party, Republican and Democrats are going crazy trying to figure out who Pitbull is going to support in 2016.  With presidential elections coming around the corner, the influence of the Hispanic vote is key in winning the White House.  According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in the 2012 presidential election, more Hispanics voted in Florida than in any other state in the nation.  Latinos came out to vote by 62%, while the average Hispanic turnout for the rest of the United States was 49%. Florida Hispanics even beat California where the turnout was 48.5% and Texas where it was 38.8%…all states with high Electoral College votes.

Danny Alvarez, a Republican and former Tampa Bay Political Director for the Rick Scott Florida Gubernatorial Campaign, thinks that the targeting of Pitbull as a surrogate is genius. “Whoever thought of it should get a big pat on the back. We are not in the day and age where one message fits all and Pitbull appeals to a very broad range of targets that we are trying to reach as far as politics and government is concerned.”

Fighting for NPAs

So, the question is, if both parties are fighting for Pitbull who is registered as ‘No Party Affiliation’ according to the Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections, shouldn’t both political parties fight for NPA’s in the same manner?  In Florida there are approximately 600,000 NPA Hispanics registered to vote—a little less than Democrats and more than Republicans. According to a 2012 Gallup poll, 51% of Hispanics identify as NPA in the United States.  However, once they are questioned further, their leanings show that most affiliate with the Democratic Party (52%) and this is consistent across generations.  However, 23% identify with the Republican Party and Hispanics with longer connections to the United States are more likely to be Republicans.

In politics, there is a division of thought on how important NPA’s are to an election. There are two schools of thought, one which believes that they are important and the other who thinks the opposite. Some Hispanic organizations are encouraging Hispanics to register as NPA since they believe that this will be the only way that political parties will not take Hispanic voters for granted.  According to Dr. Daniel Smith, professor of political science at the University of Florida, more Hispanic youth are now registering as NPA.  However he is not convinced that being NPA is the way to go when we live in a nation with a two-party system. When asked about Pitbull being NPA he states: “People in politics are not targeting Pitbull because he is NPA, they are targeting him because he is Pitbull.”

However, others think that Pitbull being NPA is a great example of why the Hispanic independent vote should not be taken for granted:

Angelette Aviles, a Republican and former political consultant thinks that both parties need to focus their energy on NPA’s. “What is so odd is that political parties do not tend to target NPAs until 3 months before the General Election.  One reason is because they consider them a waste of time being that they cannot vote in the Primary Election.” However, she believes that it is important to target them way before the Primaries.  “Like my husband, I see many Hispanics are in the middle when it comes to issues.  One day their main concerns are based on fiscal issues but the next it could be about education, or for some they may vote on a candidate who can better relate to minorities.”  Angelette’s husband recently changed his party affiliation to NPA.

Luisana Gonzalez is a 24 year old Venezuelan-American who lives in Weston, Florida and who holds a degree in International Relations from Florida State University.  Luisana is registered NPA and believes political parties should not forget about people like her. “NPA’s are more objective in their decisions.  I vote on the leader and their vision, I focus on the candidate’s policies and who the leader is, and not based on the stereotype placed by a political party,” she says.

Looking a little deeper

Most individuals interviewed all came to the same conclusion: whoever gets Pitbull, gets a great portion of the Hispanic youth vote.

However, Christian Leon, a Democrat and Political Creative Strategist says that this mentality from the parties is too general:  “Hispanics are so diverse and you are trying to find something that unites them. Everyone’s is gravitating to Pitbull because he is the common denominator that they believe all Latinos know. It shows the hunger of the parties. It also shows the lack of knowledge or leadership of the community.  What leaders are they going to turn to that appeal to Hispanics?  What person can most Hispanics relate to except for maybe the pope? If Pitbull wants to be neutral, the best thing he can do for the Latino community is write a song encouraging Latinos to vote.”

More than being neutral, it seems Pitbull has a bigger responsibility at hand.  Being an example to Hispanics, by not only talking the talk, but walking the walk.  According to his voting records, he registered to vote 5 months after turning 18.  However, from his voting history starting in 2008, the only election he has voted in is the 2008 General Election and Presidential Preferential Primary.

Maybe the next step for Pitbull is to teach the Latinos who hold our future that Politicos need to fight for their vote just as they are fighting for his.  The step is to vote himself and possibly go back to the campaign that changed the mentality of so many Hispanics living in Miami in the 80’s: “Vota para que te respeten” which means in English: Vote so that you are respected.

However, I think Pitbull knows that it is in his power to do much more than this.  He has proved he wants to see change focusing on a group of Hispanics and other minorities that we tend to forget about and who will be unstoppable in years to come.  His students at his charter middle and high school Sports Leadership and Management (SLAM), which he helped build in the same little neighborhood (Little Havana) where he lived and lacked what these children have now gained: An avenue to not get involved in drugs, receive attention, and be given the tools to become individuals that will be the leaders of tomorrow.  He needs to start voting and teach these kids the importance of voting.

The moment of truth

Republicans and Democrats should not only be fighting for Pitbull’s approval, they both should be focusing on all Hispanics and especially NPA’s or what we call political independents.

Armando Perez’ name represents Latinos who could sway either way.  The name Pitbull represents the power of Latinos and the power that we can have in politics, if we become vocal and vote.  2016 is on its way. Make a wise choice Mr. Worldwide. Like C.S. Lewis said: “There are far far better things than any we leave behind.” It’s time to start voting.  All politico eyes on you—keeping the rapping aside.

Campaigns and Political Parties Need to Spice it Up

Domino Effect English

 By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

 – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Hispanics or Latinos. Most of us are known to be warm individuals, amicable and culturally engaging. We do not tend to be a society that is reluctant to open up to those who approach us. Quite the opposite. We are that weird family inviting you over to our house without hardly even knowing you and trying to make you drink one more tequila as we try to “enchilarte” (make you eat something spicy that you can’t handle) for our entertainment. At least that is how it is in our Mexican-Colombian household. Like we would say in Spanish: “Entre mas amigos, mejor.” Translated to English; “the more friends we have, the better it is for us”.

With our culture in mind, it is mind boggling how such a great political force is not being engaged by those in political power. There is no turning back my friends. You cannot wait six months before the 2016 or 2018 election to come knocking on our door. You cannot turn away the opportunity of having a debate in a national TV channel in Spanish. You need to get to know us, and allow us to know you.  You need to gain our trust and tell us why we are so important to you, to our state and to this country.

Not engaging the Hispanic/Latino community

According to Latino Decisions, a leader in Latino political opinion research, in 2014, 55% of Latinos that were polled said they were not contacted by a campaign, political party or community organization in the final months before the election. The polls they have reported over the years document the consistently low rates of campaign engagement of Latinos/Hispanics eligible to vote.

In Florida, a state where the largest minority of registered voters is Hispanic, the 2014 gubernatorial candidate won by about 1 percentage point-a 61,000 vote difference. In 2012, Latino Decisions reported that 48 percent of registered Latinos voted nationwide. According to numbers shared by Miami Herald’s political reporter Marc Caputo, 64 percent (over 1 million) of registered Latinos voted in the 2012 Florida General Election.  As stated by different analysts and even supervisors of elections, people go out to vote based on the inertia that the campaigns and the political parties place into the election. After having conversations with both Latino Democrats and Republicans around the state of Florida, here are some observations:

We do not know who to vote for

The domino effect in reference to Hispanics and politicos is that Hispanics do not get involved due to not knowing who to vote for. Also, according to those individuals who are engaging our community, many Latinos do not know what each political party represents. To their dismay, political parties and campaigns do not take the time to invest in them.

Wait for the “big honchos” to infiltrate the state

2016 is on its way and what seems to be the tendency for political parties and campaigns to do here in Florida is to wait for the national party team to bring in their “movers and shakers” in order for them to win Florida. Many do not know the community in Florida, they just see numbers. Every 4 years a new group of people come in and have to start practically from scratch trying to figure out how to reach our community. Those Hispanics/Latinos who know the community and who are from Florida are not included and their knowledge is underestimated.

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Weighing In: The Florida Hispanic Approach of Democrats and Republicans

Donkey and Elephant on scalesBy Evelyn Perez-Verdia

There is just a 66,000 vote difference between Crist and Scott in the 2014 Florida Gubernatorial Race.  With over 1,700,000 registered voters in Florida, I still stand my ground that the Hispanic Vote could have selected the governor of this race.  I am anxious to get the recap totals from election offices around Florida in reference to the Hispanic vote.

Charlie Crist and the Hispanic Vote

One of the reasons the Crist campaign lost is due to the lack of initiative with Hispanics and the Spanish language media until too late in the game.  Once Annette Taddeo, former Chairwoman of the Miami-Dade Democratic Party became the Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor on July 17, 2014 things dramatically changed within the campaign.  Before Taddeo arrived, the media en Español all over the state complained that they were not able to get in touch with anyone from the Crist camp.

Crist was losing the Hispanic Vote.  Annette Taddeo knew the importance of this and a week later they had hired Sheyla Asencios as Hispanic Communications Director for Crist.   A little after that, there were so many inquiries that they had to hire another woman named Gricel Gonzalez to handle Spanish language media in South Florida.  You constantly heard Annette sending the message, being on interviews, on commercials, on the radio, in print and in both languages.  On one occasion she had to deal with individuals from the opposite party calling her a prostitute and telling her to go back from the country she came from when she was with her 8 year old daughter at a rally.  In the same rally, she was the better person as she hugged Carlos Lopez-Cantera.  She was a force to be reckoned with.  It was the strength that the party needed and that I believe made a difference in the closeness of voter turnout between Crist and Scott.  If the same plan would have taken place as soon as Crist announced his run for governor in November 2013, he would possibly be Florida’s next governor.  On the other hand, Rick Scott began his Hispanic agenda appointing Carlos Lopez-Cantera as Lieutenant Governor in the beginning of January and the campaign officially hired Hispanic Communications director, Jaime Florez in March.

From the silence received from the Crist campaign for almost 8 months, there was not much interest in reaching Hispanics before Annette Taddeo arrived. She ran as if she was running for governor herself.  She was the face of the candidate in Spanish.  Democrats may need to take into account that it is not only about starting early; it is about engaging the Hispanic voter.  My understanding is that Alex Sink who ran for governor on behalf of Democrats in 2010 hired a woman named Conchita Cruz as her Communications Director early in the race.  However, the force was not the same.  Sink did not have a Hispanic woman or man by her side and on the ticket to be her voice in Spanish.  Sink had Rod Smith.  The way I see it, Annette Taddeo’s talent goes beyond Florida and if I were making the calls, I would place her as the Chair of the Democratic National Committee.  Being truly bilingual is something that many Hispanic Democrats do not have.

The Inclusion of Hispanics in the Florida Republican Party

As we know, the Florida Republican Party has much experience in including Hispanics in their party.  As the Florida Democratic Party still fears to place a Hispanic in a leadership role within their party, the Republican Party has no fear in preparing young Hispanics to run for office. The Republican Party had already elected the first Hispanic Governor of Florida, Bob Martinez in 1987 as the Florida Democratic Party either fears or does not think it is important to place a Hispanic in a leadership role within their party.   It is not rocket science, Hispanics are the largest minority of registered voters in Florida.  They are passionate about politics, they just need help understanding it.

The Koch Brothers Get It

The Libre Initiative is a great example of the Republicans going to work.  It is being funded by the Koch Brothers and they are in Florida assisting the Hispanic community and making sure they know that it is the Republican Party who is doing this effort.  We also saw how in Orange County two less well-funded Hispanic Republican candidates won a race against two Democratic Anglo Saxons and incumbents who were very well funded.  This says so much.

The LEAD Task Force

When you have one person focusing on Hispanic outreach in the state of Florida for the Florida Democratic Party vs. five people doing the same for the Florida Republican Party of Florida, you know that a need is not being met.  My interest is that Hispanics are not taken for granted and are not ignored, regardless of party affiliation. There is much to learn from the Republican Party of Florida in this sense, and if Florida Democrats continue to go with the same people and the same ideas, please do not expect to win a race for Governor of Florida any time soon.

For this reason, when I saw that Florida Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant and Florida U.S. Senator Bill Nelson created a Task Force to talk about where they are going, it was important to me that it had a better representation of the Hispanic community and the “doers”. I did not understand why the majority of the people invited were the same people who have always been part of the party.  Isn’t doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results the very definition of insanity?  I asked Chairwoman Tant to include two Hispanic leaders on this task force.  Chairwoman Tant responded and she will be including one on the Task Force.   To know more about that, you can read Maria Padilla’s story here: Democrats to Add Hispanic Caucus Leader to Task Force

Moving forward

So, in order to move ahead, Democratic political operatives need to stop blaming this race on the fact that the opposition had too much money as Steve Schale has commented or that there needs to be a change in the Constitution in order to make the Florida gubernatorial race the same year as the presidential election as Kevin Cate has suggested.  Reuben Askew, Bob Graham and Lawton Chiles are clear examples that the party does not need all the money in the world to win.  Maybe it is time to go back to the drawing board and start walking Florida again.  Focus on core actions, not words.  The Florida communities are people, not numbers.  There is a way to win.  However, you will need to include the “doers” and stop going to the same people for fresh ideas.  It is time to build coalitions, it is time to include the youth and it is time to place minorities in high positions within the party.  Once you have done this, you can now compete with the machine the Republican Party has created.

Must-Go-To Event: DITAS 2014

header-ditas

Political Pasión is a community partner at this year’s Democracy in the Americas Symposium (DITAS 2014).  Ditas brings together More than 500 business leaders, heads of state, prominent scholars, social innovators and leaders of government as they gather in a 2-Day Symposium to discuss ways to bolster the democratic process and create new economic development opportunities for the next generation of leaders in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as in the United States.

 Featured speakers include Vinicio Cerezo, Former President of Guatemala; Luis Alberto Lacalle Herrera, Former President of Uruguay; Enrique V. Iglesias, Ibero-American Secretary General, and Yoani Sanchez, famous Generation Y Cuban blogger.  In addition, we will be hearing from our local leaders such as, Tomas Regalado, Mayor of the City of Miami, Luigi Boria, Mayor of the City of Doral, Alberto Carvalho, Superintendent of Miami-Dade Public Schools and Senator George LeMieux, of the Center of Public Policy .

“Defending and strengthening democracy demands positive action from society as a whole. An event like DITAS allows us to explore ideas in a forum, which can later translate into actions that will improve the democratic process in the Americas,” said Foundation’s Chairman, Jose Zambrano.

The Americas Symposium (DITAS 2014) will take place on November 6-7 at Miami Dade College – Wolfson Campus in Downtown Miami.  The registration fee is $150, including all education panels, networking cocktail and presidents’ luncheon for the 2-day symposium. To register, please visit www.ditas.org.

The Zambrano Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting projects to educate, train and mentor the next generation of leaders of the Americas. For more information on the Zambrano Foundation, please visit www.zambranofoundation.org or Democracy in Americas Symposium (DITAS 2014), please visit www.ditas.org, e-mail communications@zambranofoundation.org, or call 954-980-9453

Every year is always better than the next.  Political Pasión looks forward to seeing you at DITAS 2014!

The True Winners of an Election

Tired Businessman With Coffee

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

 Who will the winners of the 2014 elections be? Many of the issues and candidates are tied and I doubt we will know who the real winner is until the night of November 4th, if we are lucky. What I can tell you is who is winning the race so far and especially during these last few weeks:

Fast Food Joints: You may be a reporter, a political advisor, a campaign director, a volunteer or the candidate himself, but whoever you may be, during those last campaign weeks there is always something to tend to and hardly any time for food. Every day it seems there is some big event to attend and more often than not you end up connecting with people instead of the buffet table. You become that couple that can’t find the time to eat at their own wedding, or at least not well. Since you’ve had little nourishment the entire day, you end up hitting the drive thru somewhere around 4:00 p.m. and ordering the largest hamburger and fries combo alongside some over-caffeinated beverage. It would make for an interesting study to see how far up the sales of these places go during election times.

Coffee: It is usually around 9:00 a.m. when a group of ill-tempered and inarticulate zombies walk in, turn on their laptops and immediately head over in the direction of that magic potion that Juan Valdez provides. It is the norm to push back at least three coffees a day during elections, preferably double shots. I myself am writing this article sitting at a Starbucks where I am having my third caffeine serving of the day and where I’m surrounded by eight politicians having a heated meeting at almost 6:00 p.m.

Dark circle concealer: Does anybody know the meaning of “sleep” during those last weeks of the election race? Pay attention to your candidates and you’ll notice how the closer we get to November 4th, the worse they look. The night of November 3rd becomes that sleepless and endless night where everyone working on the elections just keep going straight and end up getting by on adrenaline alone for the remainder of the day.

Kleenex: Politicians and those working political campaigns could go one on one against soccer players to see who the biggest cry-baby is. Working in a political campaign you know you are in a game where there is only one winner and the others are all losers, and usually the loser will override his or her crying quota for the entire year during the night of November the 4th. But it is crucial to remain as seemingly calm as possible, smile and make that polite phone call to your opposition mumbling something congratulatory, at least until all those cameras have been turned off and everyone has finally gone home. By the time the night is finally over, you crawl back to your room where you will find yourself hugging your pillow and sobbing incoherent words into it.

It is a different story for the campaign workers who end up drowning their sorrows in the bar at their “victory party” while they cry hugging their Communications Director who is by this time hoarse from shouting all night and has band aids on each finger from typing so hard. Be that as it may, they are all out of a job by the next day.

It is not easy working election races where you give up your weekends and time with family and friends so that your candidate may be given the chance to do good on their promises. It is not just that, but it is also coping with your own ego when defeated. Politicians are passionate folk and when facing failure, we also feel we have let down our community. And so, ladies and gentlemen, this is what happens behind the curtain of a political campaign. The day after November 4th, we throw away the concealers, clean out our desks of balls of used tissues and promise ourselves we will never eat another burger! That is, at least, until the next election.

Thought Provoker: Dr. Susan MacManus, Distinguished Professor

It is a pleasure to have Dr. Susan MacManus as a “Thought Provoker” on Political Pasión.  These “Thought Provokers” are individuals (or a group) that make a difference in our community and challenge us to do the same.

I have always had very high respect for Dr. MacManus as Distinguished University Professor from my alma mater, The University of South Florida.  She also serves as Survey Director for www.sunshinestatesurvey.org and is highly sought to give her opinion on politics in Florida. Here is what Dr. MacManus had to say about the 2014 Florida gubernatorial race:

Evelyn Perez-Verdia: “Here we are with Dr. Susan MacManus from the University of South Florida. Dr. MacManus, can you tell us why the Hispanic vote is so important in this gubernatorial election?”

Dr. MacManus: “This race is tied right now and 14.5 percent of all of the registered voters in Florida are Hispanic.  So clearly they can make a difference in who wins or loses this race.  It is also true that Hispanics now outnumber African American voters in the state and are on the rise; but it is also true that the Hispanic voters are not always cohesive; they differ by country of origin– they are very fascinating to study.  But let me tell you this, there is not better proof of the power of the Hispanic vote than the fact that each of the two candidates selected a Hispanic running mate.   That pretty much says it all.”

Florida Gubernatorial Debate in Spanish on Telemundo

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

This November 2014, we will select our next governor of Florida. The candidates are Charlie Crist (www.charliecrist.com ) and Rick Scott (www.rickscottforflorida.com). Both of them have their website in Spanish. Today, October 10, 2014  www.telemundo51.com as well as their stations in Tampa, Orlando, Naples/Ft. Myers and South Florida will be presenting the debate in Spanish at 7:00 p.m.  You will also be able to watch it in English at http://www.nbcmiami.com

I was present at the debate today and want to encourage you to watch it.  You will be able to find clear differences between both candidates on many topics such as the Cuban Embargo and Medical Marijuana.  This is your opportunity listen to both sides and come to a decision of who you would like to vote for.  As Hispanics, we can only make educated decisions by being informed and getting involved.  It does not matter who you vote for, but please get involved and vote!

As you view the debate, you can give your opinion through Twitter by going to @telemundo51 #t51debate

I was able to ask Republican candidate and Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Democratic Candidate for Lt. Gov. Anette  Taddeo why it is important for Hispanics to go out and vote.  Please see videos below (Spanish):

First Political Workshop for Hispanic Journalists in Florida

Taller Politica

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

I am proud to share that Political Pasión along with http://www.miamidiario.com launched  the First Political Workshop for Hispanic Journalists in Florida.  The focus was the upcoming 2014 November elections. The event was in Spanish and had the attendance of over 40  Hispanic journalists.

Our first non-partisan workshop explained to journalists how politics and government works in this beautiful country that has embraced us. The focus of our workshops is to be empowered with information to incentivize Hispanics to go out and vote in a responsible and conscious manner.

We hope that this first workshop will be one of many that will contribute to a better understanding of politics and government in the United States by journalists of Hispanic media sources.

Our presenters were:

  • Evelyn Pérez Verdia, Founder of Political Pasión
  • Carolina López, Spokesperson for the Miami-Dade Elections Office
  • Mayra Macias, Spokesperson and  South Florida Political Director, The Florida Democratic Party.
  • Jaime Florez, Spokesperson and Hispanic Communications Director, The Republican Party of Florida
  • Annie Betancourt, Board Member,  The League of Women Voters of Florida
  • Freddy Avalos, President and Rafael Lopez, Board Member, The Hispanic Vote
  • Carolina González, Spokesperson for the American Civil Liberties Union

The workshop took place on Tuesday, September 30th from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the EB Hotel, Orchid room (4299 NW 36th St. Miami Springs, FL 33166).

The Hispanic Vote: The Largest Minority Voting Bloc in Florida

Hispanic family outside home

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

The most recent voter registration numbers as of July 28, 2014 show that there are 1,705,985 Hispanics registered to vote in Florida in the upcoming elections. 14% of the 11, 807,507 Florida registered voters are Hispanic, making us the largest minority voting bloc in Florida.  We surpassed the African American vote in Florida by 100,000.  However, our numbers are possibly higher due to the fact that the voter registration applications did not start including the term Hispanic until after 1995 on the voting registration application.  In addition, to this day, it is optional to place if you are Hispanic or not.

The five largest counties with registered Hispanics are:

 710,446 in Miami Dade County

190,322 in Broward County

153,387 in Orange County

113,380 in Hillsborough County

81,641 in Palm Beach County

This makes South Florida the most populous area of Hispanic voters in Florida.  In addition, we see why the Hispanic vote is the swing vote for the upcoming 2014 elections.

466,778 Hispanics are Republicans, 652,784 are Democrats and 558,707 have No Party Affiliation. There are only 20,831 registered as Independents.  Due to the differences in cultural, political and social beliefs, it is very difficult to know how Hispanics are going to sway.  The Hispanic vote is one of the few votes that campaigns will need to fight for.

You may ask; why such a large amount of No Party Affiliation?  My theory?  When I was spokeswoman at the Supervisor of Elections office in Broward County, the Voter Education and Outreach team would go to the Naturalization ceremonies to register new citizens.  Many new citizens did not know what it meant to be a Republican or Democrat, so they opted to place No Party Affiliation when they registered.  We live in a society where many Hispanics do not understand the beliefs of the two strongest parties that exist in the United States.  Another theory is that those Hispanics, who do understand the political parties, are tired of promises, pandering and punishment and have changed their affiliation from a specific party to focusing on what a person has to give as a candidate.  Hispanics, even when they are associated with a certain party, vote for the person and not the party.  Although many may not understand what their political views are, they do get brownie points for being charismatic, Hispanic and for being verbal in regards to the issues that matter to Hispanics.  Others just want a candidate that stands up for his or her beliefs.

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Annette Taddeo-Goldstein: A Clear Sign The Florida Democratic Party Is Changing

Annette Taddeo

Annette Taddeo-Goldstein

By Evelyn Perez-Verdia

Updated July 20, 2014

Three days before Democratic gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist announced his pick for Lieutenant Governor, through Twitter I stated that Crist would pick a woman, and if he was wise she would be Hispanic.  Hours before news came out that Crist had picked Colombian-American, Annette Taddeo-Goldstein as his running mate, I had predicted that he would pick an African American woman to be his running mate.  It was a major “foot in mouth” moment for me.  However, as a Hispanic and former Democrat, I must confess that I did not expect anything less from the Democratic Party.  For many years I saw how the Democratic Party would constantly leave Hispanics out from high positions and were not supported when they ran for political office. I felt like Taddeo mentioned herself: “too many people across Florida are feeling left out and behind.”  I felt that we as Hispanics had been left behind by the Florida Democratic Party. It is one of the reasons that in the beginning of 2010 I decided to become NPA ( No Party Affiliation).  In addition, just like many NPA Hispanics, I became tired of the political parties. I decided I would not vote for the party, I decided to vote for the best person regardless of political affiliation.

The strategy for years of the Florida Democratic Party was to always pick and support an Anglo Saxon Man.  Finally when they became more progressive and saw that the majority of this minority group favored them, they finally opened up and started including African Americans.  The Florida Democratic Party year after year has made the same decision in midterm elections. In 2010, Alex Sink picked Rod Smith.  In 2006, Jim Davis picked Darryl Jones (First and only African American).  In 2002,  Bill McBride picked Tom Rossin. In 1998, Buddy Mackay and Rick Dantzler. 1994 and 1990, Lawton Chiles and buddy Buddy Mackay. The list of white Anglo Saxon Males as the choice for the Democratic Party goes on to the day that the position of Lieutenant Governor was created in Florida. While the Florida Democratic Party continued with the same choices, in 1986 Republicans and Floridians had already embraced a Hispanic as governor, Bob Martinez.  After over almost half a century of the same, I never imagined 2014 would be the year it would finally change. Hispanics finally caught the Florida Democratic Party’s eye for a statewide gubernatorial election.

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